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Author Topic: Термини в голфа  (Read 11704 times)
ELMANIFICO
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« on: 10 March, 2008, 12:46:53 PM »

Нека някой разясни термините в голфа.

Като "грийн" (това май е единствено,което знам) и т.н
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Jerry
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« Reply #1 on: 10 March, 2008, 06:33:28 PM »


Еее, ти пък ме разби с този въпрос  Wink.. Ми, много са термините в голфа (то къде ли са малко) - питай, пък който знае ще отговаря.
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Better in the ROUGH than in the OFFICE!
rookie
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« Reply #2 on: 11 March, 2008, 09:31:38 AM »

Вземи си купи първо една книжка и прочети - имаше из виртуалната книжарница... Виж тука http://www.knijarnica-ninevia.com/catalog/product_info.php?cPath=23_59&products_id=1489&osCsid=6eb21e06f5b9e5c5645511c82a809d28
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Fore!
ELMANIFICO
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« Reply #3 on: 20 March, 2008, 01:26:16 AM »

Благодаря,когато имам възможност ще си я купя.

Ами разбих ви ,да Smiley ,но какво да направя като не знам нищо как се казва.Дано в тази книга ги има нещата обяснени по разбираем начин.

Ако нещо не разбирам,може пак да ви разбия Wink
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mladen
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« Reply #4 on: 21 March, 2008, 09:35:05 AM »

здр.Термините в голфа са много,но ето най-основните:
пар-броя удари,с които трябва да се покори дупката
бърди-когато вкараш с един удар по-малко от пара
игъл-два удара под пара
боги-един удар над пара
дабл боги-два идара над пара
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ELMANIFICO
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« Reply #5 on: 24 March, 2008, 01:05:57 AM »

здр.Термините в голфа са много,но ето най-основните:
пар-броя удари,с които трябва да се покори дупката
бърди-когато вкараш с един удар по-малко от пара
игъл-два удара под пара
боги-един удар над пара
дабл боги-два идара над пара

Благодаря много.Бях ги чувал всичките,но нито едно не знаех.!!! Задължен съм ти!
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Taylor
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« Reply #6 on: 11 May, 2008, 01:09:31 PM »

Вземи си купи първо една книжка и прочети - имаше из виртуалната книжарница... Виж тука http://www.knijarnica-ninevia.com/catalog/product_info.php?cPath=23_59&products_id=1489&osCsid=6eb21e06f5b9e5c5645511c82a809d28

Опитах се да си поръчам тази книга но се били изчерпали количествата. Някой може ли да каже откъде другаде мога да я намеря.  Wink
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rookie
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« Reply #7 on: 13 May, 2008, 08:17:57 AM »

Тука има една... http://www.books.bg/book.php?ISBN=9545284854&PHPSESSID=6qepm7uee7nn4lge18fj2c0ch7
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Fore!
Taylor
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« Reply #8 on: 14 May, 2008, 11:24:51 AM »

Благодаря! Поръчах я. Ще видим какво ще излезе. Wink
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Taylor
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« Reply #9 on: 18 May, 2008, 03:16:01 PM »

Ето някои термини в голфа подредени по азбучен ред.
"1-2-3 Best Ball"
Definition: "1-2-3 Best Ball" is a competition format for 4-person teams. Each player on the team plays his own ball throughout the round. On each hole, a predetermined number of the lower scores is used.
One the first hole, the lowest score among the four players counts as the team score. On the second hole, the two lowest scores become the team score. On the third hole, the three lowest scores become the team score. On the fourth hole, it's back to the one lowest score, and so on throughout the round.
1-2-3 Best Ball is a good way to keep all the players involved in the fate of their team.
"2-2-2"
Definition: "2-2-2" is just another name for the $2 Nassau. A $2 Nassau consists of three bets, each worth $2 - the front nine, the back nine and the full 18 hole score.
Also Known As: $2 Nassau, Best Nines

"2-Man No Scotch"
Definition: In the 2-Man No Scotch golf tournament format, team members tee off, then switch balls, each playing the second shot from where the balls lie. Beginning with the third shot, the two team members play out the hole as a scramble, and record the one low ball as the team score.
Alternate Spellings: Two-Man No Scotch

"2-Man Scramble"
Definition: A 2-Man Scramble is a competition format that is exactly what it sounds like: a scramble in which the teams consist of two players each. After each shot, the best of the two shots is selected and both players play from that spot, until the ball is holed. One team score is recorded.
Also Known As: 2-Person Scramble, Two-Person Scramble
Alternate Spellings: Two-Man Scramble

"2-Person Best Ball"
Definition: "2-Person Best Ball" is a best-ball competition format in which the teams consist of two players. Played as one team vs. another, whether stroke play or match play, it's simply another name for Four Ball. Each player on the team plays his own ball until completing the hole, then the lower of the two scores is recorded as the team score for that hole. For more explanation, see Best Ball.
Also Known As: 2-Man Best Ball, 2-Person Better Ball, Four Ball
Alternate Spellings: Two-Person Best Ball

"Thirty-Two"
Definition: Thirty-Two is a side bet for golfers that focuses on putting. It's essentially a challenge from one golfer to another to avoid a three-putt.
Let's say your buddy is facing a long, difficult putt. You invoke the thirty-two side bet. If your buddy three-putts (or worse), he owes you two units of the bet. If he two-putts (or better), you owe him three units of the bet. (If the bet is $1, for example, and he three-putts, he owes you $2; if he two-putts, you owe him $3).
Alternate Spellings: 32


"4-Man Cha Cha Cha"
Definition: In the 4-Man Cha Cha Cha tournament format, each member of the team plays his or her ball throughout. But a 3-hole rotation exists for determining how many scores are used to create the team score.
On the first hole (cha), the one low ball counts as the team score. On the second hole (cha cha), the two low balls count as the team score. On the third hole (cha cha cha), the three low balls count as the team score. The rotation starts over on the fourth hole.
For a similar format, see Irish Four Ball.
Alternate Spellings: Four-Man Cha Cha Cha

"90-Degree Rule"
Definition: The 90-Degree Rule is something golf courses may put into place when they want to allow the convenience of golf carts but minimize the impact of those carts on the golf course.
When the 90-Degree Rule is in effect, golfers are required to keep carts on the cart path until they are even with a golf ball in the fairway. Only then should the cart leave the path, turning sharply (90 degrees) to drive straight across to the golf ball. After playing the shot, the cart should be driven directly back to the cart path, then remain on the path until pulling even with another ball. In this manner, golfers have the convenience of carts but damage to the course is minimized.
The 90-Degree Rule is permanenty in effect at many courses; at others, it will be put into effect following rains or when course conditions warrant.
Look for signs near the first tee that might indicate whether the condition is in effect, or ask in the pro shop.
Even when the 90-Degree Rule is not in effect at a course, it's a good practice to follow because it helps maintain a healthier turf.

To be continued... Wink
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Taylor
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« Reply #10 on: 18 May, 2008, 03:18:55 PM »

A

"Abnormal Ground Conditions"
Definition: An "abnormal ground condition" is any of several conditions that, when they exist and your golf ball is affected by them, entitle the player to relief. Abnormal ground conditions include casual water, ground under repair and holes made by burrowing animals (e.g., gopher hole or snake hole).
Holes dug by the greenkeeper are considered ground under repair even if they are not marked as such. A few things that are not considered abnormal ground conditions: dew or frost; a hole dug by an animal that is not a burrowing animal, unless so declared by the local committee; grass clippings.
You cannot cite the abnormal ground conditions rule to take free relief if your ball is in a water hazard or lateral water hazard.
"Above the Hole"
Definition: "Above the hole" describes the position of a golf ball in relation to the cup, or hole, once the ball is on the green.
If the green slopes, or if the hole is cut in a position on the green that slopes, being above the hole with your approach shot or lag putt is a no-no.
Above the hole means that your ball is positioned such that you will be putting downhill to the cup. Downhill putts are particularly tricky, so you want to avoid being above the hole.
"Above the hole" is the opposite of "below the hole."
Examples: The Golf Guide has a tricky putt left since he left his ball above the hole.

"Ace"
Definition: A score of "1" on any hole - a hole-in-one, in other words. Aces are most commonly made on par-3s, but sometimes occur on short par-4s being played by long hitters.
Also Known As: Hole-in-one
Examples: The Golf Guide can only dream of making an ace - he'll have to be very lucky for a hole-in-one.

"Aces and Dueces"
Definition: Aces and Dueces, sometimes called Acey Ducey, is a betting game best for groups of four golfers. On each hole, the low score (the "ace") wins an agreed upon amount from the other three players, and the high score (the "duece") loses an agreed upon amount to the other three players.
The ace bet is usually worth twice the duece bet, but groups can agree on any amount. Ties for either the ace or the duece mean that no money is paid for that bet on that hole; carryovers are optional at the discretion of the group members (decide before the round starts).
It works like this: Let's say the ace bet is for $2 and the duece bet is for $1. On the first hole, A makes 4, B makes 5, C makes 5, D makes 6. A is the "ace" and wins $2 each from B, C and D. D is the "duece" and owes $1 each to A, B and C.
So A wins a total of $7 ($2 from each B, C and D, plus another $1 from D for being the "duece"), B and C have a net loss of $1 (they each pay $2 to A but get $1 from D), and D pays out $5 ($1 to each for being the duece, plus the $2 owed to A for his "ace" score).
As you can see, this game can get expensive in a hurry if high amounts are used and one or two players dominate. Be sure to play with players of similar skills, or use full handicaps, and to set a reasonable bet amount if you're not a high-roller.
Also Known As: Acey Ducey

"Acey Ducey"
Definition: Acey Ducey, also called Aces and Dueces, is a betting game best for groups of four golfers. On each hole, the low score (the "ace") wins an agreed upon amount from the other three players, and the high score (the "duece") loses an agreed upon amount to the other three players. See Aces and Dueces for more explanation and examples of how the bet works.
Also Known As: Aces and Dueces
Alternate Spellings: Acie Ducie

"Address"
Definition: The position a golfer takes as he or she stands over the ball, ready to hit - the stance is taken and the club is grounded. The club must have been grounded for a golfer to be considered at address (this distinction matters in many rules interpretations).
Also Known As: At address, address the ball, addressing the ball

"Adjusted Gross Score"
Definition: Gross score is, of course, every stroke a golfer has taken during a round, added up to a total score. Adjusted gross score is a golfer's stroke total for a round after accounting for the maximum per-hole scores allowed by the USGA's Equitable Stroke Control (ESC) guidelines.
All rounds turned in for handicap purposes must be played using Equitable Stroke Control guidelines, which set a cap on the score a player can take on any given hole. For example, you might actually have taken 10 strokes to play a hole, but according to ESC guidelines for your course handicap level, you may only be allowed to write a 7 on the scorecard.
All rounds turned in for handicaps must be adjusted gross scores.
"Advice"
Definition: We all know what "advice" is. The reason the golf rulebook addresses it is because you're not allowed to seek it or give it from certain people or under certain circumstances on the golf course.
Rule 8 in the rulebook addresses advice. Sharing information on the rules, or advice on matters considered "public information" - e.g., where a hazard is, or where the flagstick is on the green - is allowed under all circumstances.
Giving other advice that might influence another player's choices is prohibited ... unless you are playing partners. Then you are allowed to offer your partner advice. You are also allowed to seek advice from your partner, your caddie or your partner's caddie.
You can always seek advice from your own caddie.
"Aeration"
Definition: The aeration (or aerification) of greens (and sometimes fairways) occurs once or twice a year at most golf courses. To aerify, a piece of machinery built for the task cores the ground (punches holes and removes the dirt) in a certain pattern. This is done to loosen soil that has been compacted by golfers walking over it, opening up growing room for the roots and increasing oxygen to the roots. It usually takes a couple weeks for the holes to fill in and grow over. Some courses charge a reduced fee during the aerification process - all should at least give you some warning of the condition of the greens.
Also Known As: Aerification, aerify, aerate
Common Misspellings: Airation, airify, airification, airate

"Air Presses"
Definition: As described in the "Golf Guru" column from the November, 2004, issue of Golf Digest, "air presses" are one-hole bets between individuals that are called while a ball is in the air.
Set the bet amount before the round. Air presses are automatic; that is, if one is called, it is automatically accepted.
Say you're on the first tee. Your opponent steps up and smacks his drive, but, uh-oh, it looks like it's headed for the rough. You call an "air press," and the bet is in place. What you're betting is that you'll beat your opponent on this hole. Now you step to the tee. Your opponent has the option, while your ball is in the air, to double the bet.
Air presses can only be called by a player who has not yet hit on a hole (thereby ensuring that the opponent has the option to double the bet).
"Albatross"
Definition: Another term for a double eagle, or 3-under par on any one hole. Albatross is used most commonly in the U.K.

To be continued... Wink
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Taylor
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« Reply #11 on: 19 May, 2008, 04:04:57 PM »

"All Square"
Definition: In match play competition, "all square" means the match is tied. If both competitors in match play have won four holes, the match is "all square."
Also Known As: Squared up

"Alternate Shot"
Definition: Alternate Shot, also called Foursomes, is a competition format in which 2-person teams alternate hitting the same ball. The first player tees off, the second player hits the second shot, the first player hits the third shot, and so on until the ball is holed. Tee balls are alternated so that the same player doesn't hit every drive.
Alternate Shot can be played as stroke play or match play.

"Am-Am"
Definition: An Am-Am tournament is one in which two amateurs are paired - "amateur-amateur," get it? Or, as we once saw an am-am described on the Web site of a tournament organizer: "You've heard of a pro-am, right? Well, we ain't got no pros."
When a tournament is labeled as an am-am, it might imply one of the following:
• That golfers who sign up to play in the tournament will be paired with a so-called celebrity (as opposed to a professional golfer)
• Or that the tournament is a big-time amateur event in which low-handicappers are competiting
It doesn't have to imply either one of those things, of course. A designation of "am-am" often just means that if you sign up to play, you'll be paired with another amateur such as yourself on a 2-person team.
Also Known As: Amateur-Amateur
Alternate Spellings: Am Am (no hyphen)

"Ambrose Competition"
Definition: "Ambrose Competition" is another name for a scramble, but one in which a team handicap is used. All players tee off, the best shot is selected and all players hit again from that same spot. The best second shot is selected, and all players hit from that same spot, and so on until the ball is holed.
If the scramble is called an "Ambrose," it means that handicaps are used in play, with a fraction of the total handicaps of the group members serving as one handicap for the group.
For example, if it's a 2-person scramble, the handicaps of the two players are added together and divided by 4. For a 3-person scramble, divide by 6; for a 4-person scramble, divide by 8.
The arithmetic produces one group handicap which is used during play.
Also Known As: Scramble, 2-man scramble, 3-man scramble, 4-man scramble

To be continued.. Wink
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Taylor
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« Reply #12 on: 20 May, 2008, 12:44:44 PM »

"Approach"
Definition: Your shot into the green from the fairway. Any ball struck from the fairway to the green is termed an approach shot, unless you are around the greens complex (in which case the shot will most likely be termed a chip shot or pitch shot). On a par-4, the approach shot should be your second shot - your tee shot should be followed by a shot to the green (with two putts expected to produce par).

"Apron"
Definition: The closely mowed area around a putting green, between the putting surface and any rough that might also surround the green. Another term for "fringe." Sometimes called the "collar," but not always accurately. Collar and fringe may be the same thing in many instances, but a collar is not necessarily as closely mowed as an apron. A collar may refer to a collar of rough, for instance; the apron (or fringe) is always very closely mowed.
Also Known As: Fringe, froghair (seriously).

"Army Golf"
Definition: A slang term, often applied as an insult from one golfer to another, that means a player is spraying the ball all over the course in different directions. The term stems from the Army marching cadence: Left-right-left. In other words, a golfer hits one shot to the left, the next to the right, and very few of them straight.
Examples: The Golf Guide hits a ball left and then the next one right - he's playing Army golf.

"Arnies"
Definition: An Arnie is a side bet that is won by a golfer who makes par on a hole without ever being in the fairway. The amount of the bet is set before the round begins. Arnies are not something a golfer sets out to win, however - the round is played with the intent of playing as well as possible (no sandbagging, in other words). However, if along the way a golfer makes par on a hole without hitting the fairway, the Arnie is his reward.
The bet is named for Arnold Palmer, who made quite a few pars in his career on holes where he failed to find the fairway.
Also Known As: Seve

"Auto Win"
Definition: Auto Win is a match play tournament or betting game in which holes are automatically won by any player accomplishing one of the following:
• Chip-in from off the green (fringes don't count)
• Hole-out from a sand trap
• Stick an approach inside the flagstick from 150 yards out or more, or on any par 3
The player with the most holes won (call them skins or points or whatever suits your fancy) at the end of the round wins the match or the bet. If more than one player achieves an Auto Win on a hole, the options are to consider the hole halved, award no points at all, or carry over the point (or skin) to the next hole.


"Away"
Definition: When playing in a group of two or more, being the farthest away from the hole. The player whose ball is farthest away - whether in the fairway or on the green - is said to be away. The player who is away plays first.
Also Known As: Out
Examples: The Golf Guide was away, so he played first. "Who's out?" the Golf Guide asked. "You're away," his playing partner replied.

B

"Back Nine"
Definition: In most usages, the final nine holes of an 18-hole golf course. On some occasions, a tournament round of golf might begin on No. 10 rather than No. 1. In those instances, the "back nine" would refer to final nine holes played, regardless of which holes they were.

To be continued.. Wink
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Taylor
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« Reply #13 on: 21 May, 2008, 02:08:42 PM »

"Backspin"
Definition: The backward rotation of the golf ball in flight along its horizontal axis (the top of the ball is rotating back towards the player), or the measured rate of that rotation. Most golfers think of backspin more in relation to wedges - backspin is what causes some wedge shots to "back up" on the green, or roll backwards after hitting the green. But all clubs produce backspin. When the clubface makes contact with the ball, the ball slides up the clubface and is "gripped" by the club's grooves, which imparts backspin. The more lofted a club is, the more backspin it will produce. Aerodynamically, backspin produces lift which creates greater carry.

"Backweight"
Definition: Any weight attached to the back of the head of a golf club. A backweight serves to redistribute weight to the rear of a clubhead. In a driver, backweighting influences the center of gravity, lowering it and moving it back from the face, which can help those golfers who have trouble getting the ball airborne. In a putter, a backweight is most often employed to increase moment of inertia, or a clubhead's resistance to twisting. This can help those who have trouble hitting their putts in the center of the putter face. Clubs made to appeal to mid- and high-handicappers often feature backweighting properties.
Alternate Spellings: Back weight

"Baffie"
Definition: The baffie is the wooden-shafted historical (pre-20th Century) golf club that is most equivalent to a modern 4-wood. A modern 4-wood is not accurately called a baffie, however - the baffie is simply the historical club whose appearance, loft and use match best with today's 4-wood.
Source: British Golf Museum
Also Known As: Baffy, baffing spoon, wooden cleek

"Bag Raid"
Definition: Bag Raid, a k a Pick Up Sticks, is a match play game between two players. It's pretty simple: Every time a player wins a hole, his opponent gets to choose one club from his bag and remove that club from play.
Example: After A wins the first hole, B removes A's pitching wedge from play. For the rest of the round, A cannot use that pitching wedge.
Any club can be chosen, but most players give immunity to the putter (otherwise it would be the first club to go, and putting is hard enough without having to do it without a putter).
The strategy - well, aside from the strategy of not losing holes - is to first remove from your opponent's bag the clubs which he's most comfortable and best with.
When playing Bag Raid, make sure you carry the maximum allowed 14 clubs at the start of the round.
Bag Raid can be a good game for learning creative shots and practicing draws, fades, punch shots and the like.

Because by the turn - unless you're winning every hole - you'll be playing shots for which you may no longer have the appropriate club.
Also Known As: Pick Up Sticks

"Bail Out"
Definition: To play your shot to a safe area away from a potential hazard. If there is a water hazard up the fairway to the left, for example, you might "bail out" by playing your shot well to the right to avoid trouble.
Alternate Spellings: Bailout

"Bail-Out Area"
Definition: An area built into a golf hole that is designed to serve as the target for weaker or shorter players when better players will be playing a riskier shot. Picture a hole where the approach to the green is across water. Better players might play straight at the green, flying the hazard. But a weaker player probably won't be able to pull off the shot. So the course designer builds into the hole an extension of the fairway short of the green, to the side of the water hazard, so that weaker players have a safer shot to attempt. That's an example of a bail-out area.

"Ball in Play"
Definition: The ball you have in play, of course, even if you have illegally substituted one ball for another.
A ball is considered in play from the moment you make a stroke at it from the teeing ground until you hole out. The exceptions are when it is lost, out of bounds or lifted, or another ball has been substituted.
"Ball in play" is a term used frequently throughout the Rules of Golf, and there are a lot of penalties for doing things you aren't supposed to with a ball in play. So unless you are certain that you are allowed to lift a ball or otherwise influence a ball in play (other that making a stroke), don't mess with it.
To be continued.. Wink
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Taylor
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« Reply #14 on: 21 May, 2008, 02:10:54 PM »

Ball Mark
Definition: The indentation that a ball makes on a green upon landing. Typically, this occurs on high approach shots struck with mid- to long irons, or on approach shots from a greater distance struck with fairway woods. But it can occur with any club, particularly on soft greens. Ball marks should be repaired using special tools made for that purpose in order for the green to properly heal. It is also customary to repair other ball marks (other than your own) if you notice them on a green.
Alternate Spellings: Ballmark

Ball Retriever

Definition: A utensil most commonly carried, naturally, by players who hit a lot of balls into the water. It's essentially a long pole with a small scoop on the end that allows a player to "reach" into a water hazard to retrieve golf balls that would otherwise be lost. The pole is usually made of a telescoping metal.

Ballstriker
Definition: Every golfer is a ballstriker, natch. But when you hear this term used - "so-and-so is a great ballstriker" - it is referring to a golfer's abilities in the full swing. See the definition of ball striking for more explanation.
Alternate Spellings: Ball striker

Ball Striking
Definition: Most simply put, "ball striking" is just a reference to the full swing. A golfer who is said to be a great ballstriker is one who excels at the full swing.
A little more in-depth, ball striking refers to a golfer's ability to put the clubface on the ball at impact in the desired manner, time after time, and with great command. When you hear that this or that golfer is a great ballstriker, there is also the implication that the golfer can make the ball do what he or she wants - that the golfer possesses a great ability to work the ball (producing the desired amount of fade or draw, for example). Which goes back to the above: put the clubface on the ball at impact in the desired manner, time after time, and with great command.
Ben Hogan and Lee Trevino are often offered up as examples of the greatest ballstrikers because they were highly gifted at the full swing shots - they had extraordinary consistency in their swings, and were able, with great precision, to make the ball go where they wanted it to go.
Ball striking is also a statistical category tracked by professional golf tours that is a measure of a golfer's combined abilities in driving and hitting greens. To produce its Ball Striking rankings, the PGA Tour combines a player's ranking in Total Driving and Greens in Regulation. For example, Player A ranks 17th in Total Driving and first in GIR. Add those two numbers together for a value of 18. If that's the lowest such value, then Player A is No. 1 in Ball Striking.
Ball Washer
Definition: A device commonly found beside tee boxes for cleaning golf balls. Golfers place a golf ball into a slot and, most typically, turn a crank or pull a plunger up and down. The ball is washed in a detergent solution and scraped by bristles. A towel is usually attached for drying.
Also Known As: Ball cleaner, ball cleanser.
Alternate Spellings: Ballwasher.

Barkies
Definition: Barkies are side bets that are won by a golfer who makes par on a hole on which he's hit a tree. Most groups playing Barkies stipulate that leaves don't count - the ball must make contact with wood. A double barkie is worth twice the bet and involves making par despite hitting two trees on the same hole.
Of course, no golfer wants to hit a tree, so Barkies are not things that a golfer sets out to do. But it can add a fun side game to a round of golf and is a good reward for a golfer who recovers for par after hitting a tree.
Also Known As: Woodies, Seve's

Barranca
Definition: "Barranca" is a term that describes a physical feature of the land on which a golf course is built. A barranca is a dry ditch, gully or ravine that is filled with rocks. Sometimes barrancas are a mixture of smaller rocks, sandy soil and desert plants. When barrancas are present on a golf course, they usually are positioned to cross a fairway. How they are played is usually covered in local rules, but the norm is for a barranca to play as a hazard.

Belly Putter
Definition: A type of putter that features a longer shaft than a conventional putter (but not as long as a long, or broomstick, putter). The belly putter is so called because the longer shaft is anchored against the golfer's stomach, which serves as a fulcrum for making the stroke.
The form and function of a belly putter is much closer to that of a conventional putter than a long putter. Like the conventional putter, a belly putty is used by employing a two-handed stroke with similar putting posture. The connection to the body with a belly putter helps stabilize the wrists through the stroke.
To be continued.. Wink
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